Dr Cindy Sutherland

Dr Cindy Sutherland

Cindy has worked regularly at the Wynnum Bayside Veterinary Surgery for over six years. She is able to offer a wealth of clinical experience in small animal practice.

Recommended Tick Prevention for Dogs

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  1. Avoid the tick habitat during tick season such as bush / scrub, wetland areas (July – Dec in the Brisbane area)
  2. Finger-tip search your pets daily for ticks
                 - Ticks have to be attached 36-48hrs to cause problems
    - Feel all over the body using your finger-tips
    - Start at the head and then systematically check your pet all over to the tip of their tail!
    - Don’t forget eyes, inside the mouth, ears, groin, armpits, between the toes, any skin folds,   remove collar and check neck etc.
    - Investigate any small lumps found
  3. Remove Ticks
    - If you find a tick remove it immediately (Some dogs can be infested with many ticks at one time so don’t forget to check for more!)
    - This is done by grasping the tick with fingernails, a pair of tweezers or a tick-removing device as close to the dog or cat’s body as possible. A short, sharp tug  will dislodge the tick which can then be killed
    - Then keep your pet quiet and observe for the next 48hrs as signs of toxicity may occur after the tick has been removed
                     Remember if you are worried then contact us immediately as the sooner we treat the better!
  4. Use a tick prevention product such as:
    - Tick collars: Kiltix, Preventix, Scalibor (last 6-12wks dependent on brand)
    - Fortnightly spot-ons: Advantix

Exploding the myths of desexing

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Desexing your dog at a young age not only helps to solve the serious problem of unwanted puppies and kittens, but also makes for better pets! It WON’T change the beautiful nature of your pet! Plus de-sexing has health benefits in later life!

Desexing is a surgical procedure that involves removal of part of your pet’s reproductive system under general anaesthetic. It is a day procedure. Recovery takes 10 days for both male and female dogs and cats.

BENEFITS

Castrated male dogs are less dominant and less territorial to other dogs and people. They no longer have the urge to mate. This makes them less likely to wander, get into fights or be hit by cars. It prevents testicular disease and prostatic problems which are common in older male un-desexed dogs.

Spayed female dogs are more relaxed and less dominant. It is a myth that you have to wait until female dogs have their first litter of puppies before being desexed. In fact, desexing females before their first season will reduce the risk of them developing breast cancer, ovarian cancer or uterine infections later in life.

Once you have desexed your dog, your vet will give you a desexing certificate so you can get a registration rebate from the council!

Castrated male cats are less dominant and less territorial to other dogs and people. They no longer have the urge to mate. This makes them less likely to wander, get in to fights or be hit by cars. It helps to stop the bad urine smell and ‘spraying’.

Spayed female cats are more relaxed and less dominant . it is a myth that you have to wait until female cats have their first litter of kittens before being desexed. in fact, desexing females before they have their first season will reduce the risk of them developing breast cancer, ovarian cancer or uterine infections later in life. Undesexed female cats call constantly for a mate when they come on heat which can happen every 3 weeks! De-sexing will prevent / stop this problem.

Desexing is recommended at 5-6 months of age for both male and female puppies and kittens

 

Microchipping

If your pet becomes lost a microchip can help make sure that you pet is safely reunited with you.

A microchip is about the size of a grain of rice and can be implanted by your vet at the back of the neck.

It contains a barcode and your contact details which are recorded on the Australasian Animal Registry database for the life of your pet. This means your pet is permanently identified Australia-wide and can be safely returned to you even if there is no collar or Council registration tag.

Once you’ve microchipped your pet you will receive a certificate of identification in the post.

Once you have microchipped your pet, don’t forget to update your address details if you move! Or if the ownership of your pet changes!
This can be done via the website (www.aar.org.au) or via the telephone (02 9704 1450).

Pets must be microchipped before reaching 12 weeks of age.

Dr Jenny Hall

Dr Jenny Hall

Jenny is the principal vet and practice owner of the Wynnum Bayside Veterinary Surgery. She has 30 years experience in small animal practice and a PhD in Koala Diseases. Jenny’s special interests are in surgery and feline medicine.

Groom your dog

dog-grooming

Snip, clip, wash and dry! Groom your dog like a pro.

Ever watched your dog roll on the ground, lick her coat or chew at a mat on her fur? These are her ways of keeping clean. Sometimes, though, she’ll need a little extra help from her friend to look her best.

Make Grooming as Enjoyable as Possible—For the Both of You!

Grooming sessions should always be fun, so be sure to schedule them when your dog’s relaxed, especially if she’s the excitable type. Until your pet is used to being groomed, keep the sessions short—just 5 to 10 minutes. Gradually lengthen the time until it becomes routine for your dog. You can help her get comfortable with being touched and handled by making a habit of petting every single part of your dog, including such potentially sensitive Read More