Tag Archives: kitten

Making your new kitten or cat feel at home

happy cat

With sensitive handling and friendly contact for at least an hour a day, your new kitten should be very comfortable with you and their new home

Be sure, if there are also young children in the home that they are taught that a kitten is not a toy, but a living creature who must be treated with gentleness and respect.

Cats like to have a place to hide in order to feel secure also opportunities to get up high if they are feeling threatened.

Provide your pet with lots of opportunities for interest, challenging play that will satisfy their natural instincts. Toys that they can pretend to ‘hunt’ and capture and special posts that they can scratch (instead of your carpets and furniture)

House Training

Kittens are easy to house train. Have a kitty litter tray ready when the kitten first arrives home and should him/her where it is. After each meal and after waking up from a sleep, place your kitten in the litter tray and scratch their front paws in the litter.

Clues that your kitten may need to go to the toilet include: scratching or squatting, each time you see these behaviours place your kitten in the litter tray.

Have at least 2 litter trays per cat and change them regularly – cats don’t like unflushed toilets any more than you do!

Place litter trays in a private place away from noisy dogs and other disturbances, as well as away from food and water bowls or near where your cats sleep

Travel safety

When travelling with your cat, ensure that you use a good quality cat carrier. It is not safe to carry your cat in your arms as cats can become frightened easily and this can cause accidents to yourself, other and your cat. If you do not have a cage and need to go to the vet, then Wynnum Bayside Veterinary Surgery do offer a cat box rental scheme. Please call or drop in for further information.

Also, other suitable carriers would be a plastic storage box that is suitably sized for your cat to travel in and has a secure lid. Place a favourite bed in the bottom and make sure there are plenty of holes in the sides and lid for ventilation.

 

Why it is important to protect against intestinal worms in kittens / cats

worm vector bought from shutterstock[1]

Intestinal worms are parasites that live in a cat’s intestines. All cats can get worms, but kittens are most at risk! Worms can make your kitten very sick causing weight-loss, diarrhoea and even death.

Cats are infested with worms by everyday contact with eggs in soil that has been contaminated by poo, from eating fleas whilst grooming, or through close contact with other animals.

Whilst uncommon, you and your family can catch worms from your kitten or cat. Babies and small children are most at risk as their immune systems are not fully developed and they often forget to wash their hands after playing with their kitten. Therefore, it is important to teach children to wash their hands.

The common intestinal worms that we medicate against are Roundworm, Hookworm and tapeworm. Worming should be done regardless of whether worms are seen in poo or not, as many are too small to be seen with the naked eye.

Symptoms of a worm infestation can be varied. Signs to look out for are:

  • Poor growth
  • Poor coat, loss of vitality and lethargy
  • Pot-bellied appearance
  • Abdominal pain as a result of inflammation of the intestinal wall
  • Diarrhoea and vomiting
  • Blood in poo as a result of intestinal bleeding
  • Itchy sores (often on paws)

Recommended worming prevention program:

  • 6-12wks old: Fortnightly tablet
  • 3-6mths olds: Monthly tablet
  • 6mths onwards: Tablet every three months

Alternatively, there are products available that incorporate intestinal worming with fleas and heart worm prevention

Regular poo picking in your garden is also extremely important!

Why should I vaccinate my kitten or cat?

vaccination

New born kittens are usually protected from disease for the first few weeks of life by their mother’s milk, but this is only short term, and by about seven weeks of age this immunity provided by the mother starts to wear off, leaving kitten un-protected against life-threatening diseases unless they are vaccinated.

Kittens need to have a course of ONE TO THREE or FOUR vaccinations to be protected against disease depending on whether your cat is an indoor or outdoor cat. It is important that your kitten stays indoors until they have had the full course of vaccinations.

Recommended vaccination program:

INDOOR cats only need the F3 Vaccination program

OUTDOOR cats need both the F3 & FIV vaccination programs

6-8wks                    F3 Vaccine (Cat Flu 2 types, Feline enteritis) 

12wks                      F3 vaccine & FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus)

16wks                      F3 & FIV vaccine

20wks                     FIV vaccine

Annual boosters F3 & FIV vaccines required to maintain immunity